Help save a life

The Maternity Ward of East-Tallinn Central Hospital needs a neonatal resuscitation unit for very premature babies

  • Campaign goal: raising donations for buying a LifeStart neonatal resuscitation unit for the Maternity Ward of East-Tallinn Central Hospital

    Amount necessary: 30,000 euros

    Fund-raising campaign timeframe: until 31 December 2018

Donation by making a call:

  • 900 1005 – 5 eurot

  • 900 1015 – 15 eurot

Donation by bank transfer:

  • SEB Pank EE851010220025580016

  • Payee: AS Ida-Tallinna Keskhaigla

  • Description: Aita päästa elu

Introduction

The Maternity Ward of the Central Hospital needs a LifeStart neonatal resuscitation unit for very premature infants. Due to the special ergonomic design solution of the LifeStart platform, clinical staff can have access both to the newborn and the mother immediately after the birth, and umbilical cord clamping can be delayed, which allows the blood from the umbilical cord to be transferred to the baby naturally. The above will help a very premature infant to adapt to life out outside the womb in a more natural way. However, there is no such resuscitation unit in any maternity hospital in Estonia.

According to doctor Pille Andresson, head of the neonatology department of the Maternity Ward of the Central Hospital, there is more and more evidence that delayed umbilical cord clamping provides numerous remarkable benefits to the infant: “Studies show that a 30—120 second delay in umbilical cord clamping ensures that blood from the placenta continues to be transferred to the baby, which is associated with higher post-partum blood circulation stability, higher hemoglobin count, decreased blood transfusion necessity as well as decreased occurrence of intraventricular hemorrhage and inflammatory bowel disease. If the infant does not receive this additional blood, it can be dangerous, resulting in hypovolemia and a drop in blood pressure, which may be crucial for premature infants and for newborns with impaired cardiorespiratory function.”

“When umbilical cord clamping is delayed, the infant continues to receive placenta blood rich in oxygen for a while until the newborn’s lungs open and he or she begins to breathe spontaneously. This is especially important for pre-term infants. Evidence from practice shows that adaptation problems resulting from premature birth are alleviated if the newborn begins breathing before the umbilical cord is clamped,” doctor Andresson noted.

2017 newborn statistics in Estonia:

  • A total of 13,675 babies born in Estonia, of which 4175 delivered in the Maternity Ward of East-Tallinn Central Hospital – that is, every third child.
  • There was a total of 703 pre-term births (between weeks 22-36 of gestation) in Estonia, of which 334 were delivered the Maternity Ward of East-Tallinn Central Hospital – that is, every second child.
  • The Maternity Ward of East-Tallinn Central Hospital delivered 99 pairs of twins, of which 55 pairs were premature; in addition, there were two cases of premature triplets and one birth of very premature quadruplets.
  • A total of 626 newborns required treatment in the neonatology department.

Source: www.tai.ee